Horse Riding Some Tips

One of the most important tips in picking out which horse to ride stems from which horse bread has been developed for riding where you want to take it. Here some of the horses I’ve ridden are pictured and explained.

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   Appaloosa Bread

   The first horse ridding tips cover a bread of horses that were developed by native Indians way up in the northern part of America. The bread is one of the most colorful horses around. In many cases they resemble that bread named paints. The distinctive look of this bread of horses usually is a bunch of small spots somewhere. They are ridden in the south western states up in the Rocky Mountains like they had originally bread for. Cowboys and cowgirls can run across them while camping because several hunters ride them through the forest while deer hunting. Some of the ropers have learned this horse riding tip before they start hitting a rodeo arena. That allows them to ride some Appaloosa mare as they team rope without any trouble. Unfortunately not every horse of this bread has any spotty color. They just have the normal plain look. Here is a white Appaloosa mare in a pasture with a tall mule.These two animals tended to be the safest ones to ride in the Rocky Mountains. One didn’t have to worry about loosing control and falling off any cliff.

                                                

   Quarter Horse

   Another piece of the horse ridding tips revolves around horses that are still used in ranching. There are still some places in the south west that are made up of wide open fields. These open areas still have large herds of cattle grazing on them. Ranchers still have to herd some cattle around. They have had to pick out a bread of horses to get as much work done as possible. In these wide open ranches cowboys and cowgirls tend to run across Quarter Horses. They are also ridden in the roping arena. It’s just that they aren’t as popular as the Appaloosa bread every where in the south west.

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