Emotions in Equestrian Training

Emotions in human beings play a big role in shaping our behavior. Animals also have their own emotions even though we may not realize it. Anthropomorphism is the act of projecting human emotions unto animals or as Webster Dictionary defines it; the act of humans attributing human shape or characteristics to animals, inanimate object or a god. Emotions can either be positive or negative. Anger, disgust, fear and sadness are all negative emotions while happiness and surprise are on the positive side. All these come into play in equestrian training.

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Emotions in human beings play a big role in shaping our behavior. Animals also have their own emotions even though we may not realize it. Anthropomorphism is the act of projecting human emotions unto animals or as Webster Dictionary defines it; the act of humans attributing human shape or characteristics to animals, inanimate object or a god. Emotions can either be positive or negative. Anger, disgust, fear and sadness are all negative emotions while happiness and surprise are on the positive side. All these come into play in equestrian training.

Anger for instance is a natural emotion that has to do with survival. It can come as a reaction to being trapped or hurt, reaction to the thought of intentions harm or mistreatment. Every horse trainer will usually see these characteristics in a herd of horses. If the trainer pushes the horse to a position where it feels trapped, you observe the horse reacting with ear pinning, kicking, tail switching or striking and in some extreme cases, charging.

Disgust is a reaction that makes animals stay away from things they feel bad about, like staying away from food sources contaminated by feces. This emotion most times do not come with some recognizable reactions like anger, it is still there. Sometimes, you see the horse spitting out everything in his mouth and refusing to eat again from that same spot. This is due to disgust.

Fear is an emotion needed by prey animals including horses for survival. Fear is a reaction to a real source of danger. This kind of danger is one that is expected to come with pain or discomfort. There are fears that come from experience, if a horse receives a shock from the fence, the horse will learn to fear wire fences.

Sadness is the opposite of happiness. Everyone observes when a horse is happy by the way he plays or runs around in circles. Sadness is a drop in interaction or interest or even happiness. Sadness can occur as a result of injury, illness or bad food.

Surprise has to do with involuntary reactions which occur when one suddenly is faced with an unexpected situation. Usually, surprise is immediately followed by other emotions, such as fear, happiness or anger depending on what brought about the surprise. A rabbit bolting in front of a horse will make him show this emotion of surprise which definitely will be felt by the rider.

These are some of the emotions one can experience in equestrian training. There are other emotions as well such as: Acceptance, Affection, Aggression, Anxiety, Boredom, Confidence, Confusion, Depression, Doubt, Frustration, Grief, Hunger, and Interest.

Get more information on equestrian training, visit http://horseintraining.info

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